Me in 2019.jpg
Sienna Brown was born in Kingston, Jamaica, spent her childhood there, before moving to Toronto, Canada and now lives in Sydney, Australia. 
 
Creativity in all its myriad forms is the default filter through which she views the world. It's what engages all her senses, and keeps her on the path of discovery.
 
She was a professional dancer which gave her discipline, focus and the richness of sensory interchange between mind and body, movement, rhythm, & space.

She's been a producer, director, editor and writer of documentaries and educational films expanding her skills by exploring story through images and sound.

 
She's a teacher and editor, it's a process she enjoys. 

Behind it all, there have always been words. Communication. The love of language, the beauty of books. Black letters on the white page.

Emotional moments threaded together, to tell and retell the ongoing story of what it means to be human and our place in the ever evolving, expanding world.

Her debut novel Master of My Fate, published in 2019 by Penguin Random House, won the MUD Literary Prize at Adelaide Writers Week for the best debut novel by an Australian writer and was shortlisted for the ARA Historical Novel Prize, in 2020.

In 2021, she was commissioned by ABC Radio National, the History Listen Series to create Caribbean Convicts in Australia, a podcast based on her research for Master.

In 2022, she's been appointed as Research Associate at Western Sydney University. Her position is being funded by a three-year Australia Research Council (ARC) Discovery Project Grant and is administered through the Writing & Society Research Centre.

She is also currently writing her second novel Under an Island Sun set against the backdrop of the 1938 workers riots in Jamaica, which were a direct result of the draconian laws set in place by the British after the abolition of slavery. 
Member of ASA
The Australian Society of Authors acknowledges the Gadigal people of the Eora nation, the Traditional Owners of the land on which we meet and work, and all Traditional Owners of country throughout Australia. We recognise Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' continuing connection to land, place, waters and community. We pay our respects to their cultures, country and elders past present and emerging. The ASA respects Australia's first storytellers.